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Skin Cancer and the Sun

More and more people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the UK. There are now more people dying from skin cancer here in the UK than in Australia. There is a real worry that this will get worse over the next years unless people take care in the sun.

‘Too much sun’ causes most of skin cancers. It is now known that people with fair skin needs more care under the sun.

It is the ultraviolet (UV) Index, NOT the temperature, to judge how strong the sun is. If the UV index is high, this means the sun is stronger and needs less time to burn the skin. Lower UV index numbers means the sun is less strong and takes more time to get burn the skin. The UV index is not the same in different places, and it depends on the time of the year and day. It is also important to remember the skin can still get burned during cloudy days.

Sun creams alone do not give enough protection against the sun. Sun creams do not mean people can stay longer outside in the sun.

Serious sunburn and too much exposure to the sun (especially when as a child) may lead to skin cancer.

Following simple rules can help prevent skin cancer:

  • During the hours between 11am and 3pm, stay in the shade, away from the sun. The sun is at its strongest point during this time, and can cause a lot of damage to the skin. If this is not possible, cover up with long sleeved and tightly woven clothes and wear a wide brimmed hat and UV protected sunglasses.
  • Avoid sunburn. Sunburn increases the risk of skin cancer.
  • Use high factor sun creams (Factor 15 or higher). Remember to put lots of cream often on the skin. Little amounts of sun creams will not help protect the skin from the sun.
  • Put on sun cream 30 minutes before going out in the sun.
  • Babies’ and children’s skins are more sensitive than adults’ skins.Be sure to take care of their skin in the sun. Keep them out of the sun during the middle of the day.
  • Take care while on the beach as the sun can reflect on the sand and water, which can lead to sunburn.
  • Any changes in moles or skin growths should be reported quickly to the doctor.

Check out the other sections below...

Contraception
Contraception
Drugs
Drugs
Money Management
Money Management
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Volunteering
Volunteering
Skin Cancer and the Sun
Skin Cancer and the Sun
Smoking
Smoking
Alcohol
Alcohol
Diabetes
Diabetes
Obesity
Obesity